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Koch, Hungary

The Koch family's winemaking traditions go back as long ago as 1748 and through many generations in the Hajós-Bajai area.

Koch Csaba was born in 1969 and he inherited a few lines of vines from his Grandfather in 1991. After reading Biology at Universtiy and becoming an Agriculture Engineer as well as graduating at Kecskemét Gardening and Agriculture Collage in Viticulture, Koch Csaba became the President of the Hajós Association of Winegrowers, a member of the Hungarian Wine Academy, member of the Board of the Hungarian Winegrowers Association and his wines are winning an endless number of national and international gold awards. He was awarded Winery of the Year, Hungary in 2014.

Viticulture

Koch’s attitude to winemaking is to approach it with as little intervention as possible. He is a lover of nature and he encourages wildlife around his winery and vineyards to thrive. His theory is that with less intervention in nature’s cycles, nature takes care of itself especially with regards to pest control. On the vineyard you will find apple and other fruit trees growing happily next to the vines. All grapes are harvested by hand. His vineyards are based in two locations, Hajós Bajai and the famous Villany. They are both very different in terms of soil and altitude. The vineyards in Barota are in the fertile plain, whilst the vineyards in Villany have altitude of 400 meters and limestone soils with clay. This allows Koch to grow many different type of grapes, indigenous and international. He grows 11 different types and has a small nursery where he experiments with old and new grape DNA and crossings.

Winemaking

With a varied selection in his winemaking palette, Koch’s winemaking techniques will depend on the grape variety and PDO requirements. White grapes undergo temperature controlled cold maceration, stainless steel. Most reds age in oak, mainly new oak, up to 2 years old. Kekfrankos and Kadarka is aged for 6 months, other varietals require longer ageing.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Koch’s attitude to winemaking is to approach it with as little intervention as possible. He is a lover of nature and he encourages wildlife around his winery and vineyards to thrive.
  • All grapes harvested by hand.
  • A winemaking tradition that dates back to 1748.